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Posts Tagged / Ronald Reagan

  • Apr 15 / 2013
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Your Weekly Politickle: IRON LADY

Thatcher

Feel free to publish, post, or pass on Your Weekly Politickle by F.R. Duplantier:

IRON LADY
There was no one in England could match her,
Not one woman or man of her stature.
She was destined to be
In that Triumphant Three:
John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, Dame Thatcher.

From the archive:

VIVA IL PAPA!
I remember the blear Berlin Wall
And the day that it started to fall,
And the part that was played
By a man unafraid –
The inspired and inspiring John Paul.
(2005)

FAREWELL, MR. PRESIDENT
How that constant, comic quipper
With his humor kept us chipper!
He’s no longer here,
So let’s go out there
And win one for the gipper!
(2004)

Last week’s limerick:

SWISH!
“It was best not to tell it or ask it,
But it’s out now, so why try to mask it?
Yes, Obama enjoys
Pick-up games with the boys,
But he pouts when he can’t get a basket.”

  • Feb 04 / 2011
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Celebrate Reagan’s Centennial Feb. 6th

reagan

Where are the real heroes? Why can’t we see them? They’re outshined by the charlatans. They’re hidden in the shadows cast by statues erected to false idols. But they’re there, visible to all who really look for them: the larger-than-life heroes like John Paul II and Ronald Reagan, Mother Theresa and Phyllis Schlafly; as well as the everyday heroes witnessing to life at abortion mills, educating their children at home, blowing the whistle on government corruption, and performing countless other unfashionably selfless deeds in the face of scorn and abuse. No more heroes? Don’t you believe it. And don’t let such foolish “wisdom” pass unchallenged. — “Our Clay Idols & Our Unsung Heroes,” F.R. Duplantier

  • Sep 29 / 2010
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Going Down?

Polling suggests that younger Americans, oblivious to the historical record, are developing increasingly positive views of socialism. Sometime in the not-too-distant future, the United States and Cuba may pass each other going opposite directions, the latter lifting toward freedom and prosperity while the former falls into collectivist decay. — Kevin E. Schmiesing

  • Feb 06 / 2009
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Happy Birthday to a Real President!

reagan

Where are the real heroes? Why can’t we see them? They’re outshined by the charlatans. They’re hidden in the shadows cast by statues erected to false idols. But they’re there, visible to all who really look for them: the larger-than-life heroes like John Paul II and Ronald Reagan, Mother Theresa and Phyllis Schlafly; as well as the everyday heroes witnessing to life at abortion mills, educating their children at home, blowing the whistle on government corruption, and performing countless other unfashionably selfless deeds in the face of scorn and abuse. No more heroes? Don’t you believe it. And don’t let such foolish “wisdom” pass unchallenged. — “Our Clay Idols & Our Unsung Heroes,” F.R. Duplantier

  • Jan 28 / 2009
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The First [Blank] President

jfk1The symbolic value of Barack Obama’s election is hard to overstate, and the jubilation of black Americans well warranted. But, being the first this or that can be a millstone as well as a milestone, and jubilation turn to disgust and disgrace.

Remember the “first Catholic president”? American papists were ecstatic at the election of John F. Kennedy, but Camelot came apart, and rather quickly. The first Catholic president turned out to be a whore-mongering, double-dealing, feckless idiot, a Catholic in name only, and an everlasting embarrassment to members of the faith he professed.

I’ve overcome the disgrace by disavowing JFK. To my mind, Ronald Reagan was the first Catholic president, in practice if not in name. Black Americans may want to recalculate their pioneer, too, if Obama disappoints in like fashion.

  • Nov 20 / 2008
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Jimmy Carter’s Legacy

Nicaragua . . . wants to eliminate American economic, political, cultural, and strategic influence from the hemisphere. The space left by the U.S. will be occupied by countries like Iran, Russia, and China. — Luis Fleischman, Center for Security Policy

My two eldest daughters both got to vote in a presidential election for the first time this year — one had recently turned 18, the other 21. The older was exasperated that she had had to wait three years to participate in this ritual, and disgusted by the candidates she had to choose between when she finally got her chance.

I know exactly how she felt. I turned 18 in 1974 and had to wait two years to vote in a presidential election, only to have a choice between the bumbling Jerry Ford and the unknown but grating Jimmy Carter. I sat out the 1976 election, lived to regret it, and enthusiastically cast my first vote for president in 1980, at the ripe age of 24, for Ronald Reagan. Thirty years later, we’re still suffering the consequences of Carter’s single term and his insane encouragement of revolution in Latin America and the Mideast! Of course, in the absence of Carter’s disastrous domestic and foreign policies, Reagan might never have been president; nevertheless, if I had it to do over again, I would hold my nose and vote for Ford.

The only time I ever voted for a third-party candidate was in 1988, the year I covered the Democratic and Republican conventions for the news magazine I edited. I was living in the Boston area at the time, familiar with Michael Dukakis, and confident that he had no chance of winning. So, to express my disapproval for George H.W. Bush, who had made clear his contempt for the Reagan Revolution and his determination to steer a different course, I cast my ballot for Ron Paul. That, I have never regretted. I did vote for Papa Bush in 1992, however, when Ross Perot was siphoning off enough of his support to throw the election to Bill Clinton, which he did — to our country’s everlasting shame.

In several of the elections since, including this year’s, I have had heated discussions with self-avowed conservatives who expressed a determination to vote for a third-party candidate. Having once cast a protest vote myself, I am certainly sympathetic to the temptation (though not to the sanctimonious self-righteousness with which they announce their decision); but failing to vote for the lesser of two evils when the greater evil is likely to win as a result is, to my mind, just plain stupid.

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