:::: MENU ::::

Posts Tagged / Bob Duplantier

  • Mar 01 / 2013
  • 0
Uncategorized

Some Things Never Change

Alexander Pope

Alex. Pope, 1688-1744

The famous Lord Halifax was rather a pretender to taste than really possessed of it. When I had finished the two or three first books of my translation of the Iliad, that Lord “desired to have the pleasure of hearing them read at his house.” Addison, Congreve, and Garth were there at the reading. In four or five places Lord Halifax stopped me very civilly, and with a speech each time of much the same kind:”I beg your pardon, Mr. Pope, but there is something in that passage that does not quite please me. Be so good as to mark the place and consider it a little at your leisure. I’m sure you can give it a better turn.”

I returned from Lord Halifax’s with Dr. Garth in his chariot, and as we were going along was saying to the Doctor that my Lord had laid me under a good deal of difficulty by such loose and general observations; that I had been thinking over the passages almost ever since, and could not guess at what it was that offended his lordship in either of them. Garth laughed heartily at my embarrassment, said I had not been long enough acquainted with Lord Halifax to know his way yet, that I need not puzzle myself in looking those places over and over when I got home. “All you need do,” says he, “is to leave them just as they are, call on Lord Halifax two or three months hence, thank him for his kind observation on those passages, and then read them to him as altered. I have known him much longer than you have, and will be answerable for the event.”

I followed his advice, waited on Lord Halifax some time after, said “I hoped he would find his objection, to those passages removed,” read them to him exactly as they were at first, and his lordship was extremely pleased with them and cried out: “Ay, now they are perfectly right! Nothing can be better.” — Alexander Pope

Young Bob

Bob Duplantier, 1956-??

The above passage, which I came across while reading The Oxford Book of Literary Anecdotes, was particularly amusing to me, as I had a similar experience nearly 300 years later, in 1979, at the beginning of my on-and-off-and-on-again career as a copywriter. One of my regular assignments at the New Orleans agency that gave me my first job in advertising was to write a week’s worth of 30-sec radio spots promoting each issue of our local, then-daily newspaper, The Times-Picayune. I was given advance copies of articles and columns that would run in the week ahead and would draft a 75-word promo for each day, highlighting the most interesting items available to me.

It was a relatively simple task, and I thought I was doing a pretty good job of it, but the woman serving as account executive would always return each week’s batch of scripts to the secretary with numerous “corrections” for her to make to my copy. I would pore over these corrections and try to make sense of them, so as to avoid making the same errors again, but the exact nature of my work’s inadequacy forever eluded me.

Then, one day, after months of this agonizing and frustrating process, the secretary related an incident to me that explained everything.

On this particular occasion, the account executive had returned my copy to the secretary with the usual assortment of seemingly arbitrary and unnecessary changes to be made. An hour or so later, before the secretary had had a chance to make the changes, the AE returned and picked up a xerox of the original draft. Thinking it was the revised version, she looked it over, pronounced it much improved, and went on her way.

  • Jan 03 / 2013
  • 0
Uncategorized

Use Our Imagination!

BigFam

Creative Duplantiers at home in St. Louis, Going up the stairs: Max, Ria, Audrey, Crozet, Ida, Izzy, Bob & Evann

Graphic design, writing, editing. Duplantier Creative does it all.
Three generations. A communications dynasty.

dcBob Duplantier is a writer and editor with 35 years’ experience in journalism, advertising, and publishing. Both of his parents were writers and editors, too.

Evann (Tolhurst) Duplantier is a graphic artist with 30 years’ experience. She’s also the product of two press people.

Bob and Evann met at an advertising agency in New Orleans in 1982 and were married in 1986. The six Duplantier kids have inherited their parents’ art and writing skills.

If you need help with an art or writing project, why not use our imagination?

website

  • Jan 02 / 2013
  • 0
Uncategorized

Use My Imagination!

Editor, chef, adman, agitator, bon vivant, poet. Hire any one of these guys and get the other five for free! But you must act now. Offer good for a limited time only. Email frd@politickles.com.

F.R. Duplantier

 

FREE-LANCE WEB EDITOR/WRITER: July 2008 – PRESENT
Currently managing content on multiple websites for diverse array of clients and ghostwriting op-eds for national trade organizations.

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR: National Office, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Maryland Heights MO, October 2005 – July 2008
Responsible for website and all publications, PR and advertising, annual meeting, and other member services.

FREE-LANCE EDITOR/WRITER: November 2001 – October 2005
Developed commissioned or self-generated projects in journalism, advertising, and publishing, including innovative multimedia civics program for schoolchildren.

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: America’s Future, St. Louis, May 1995 – November 2001
Wrote and produced conservative commentary broadcast daily on 100+ radio stations and published in 500+ newspapers. Edited bimonthly newsletter. Promoted and publicized America’s Future. Networked with other policy groups. Redesigned newsletter, launched first website, and introduced electronic delivery of commentaries.

HEAD COPYWRITER: Berger & Reed Advertising, New Orleans, January 1991 – May 1995
Created multimedia advertising campaigns for Cox Cable, Baumer Foods, Louisiana Gas Service Company, et al.

EDITOR: The New American, Appleton WI, Jan. 1986 – Jan. 1991
Improved look and content of this biweekly conservative news magazine and personally devised and implemented austerity campaign to reduce annual production costs by $250,000. Assigned articles, edited manuscripts, oversaw production, and devised advertising and promotions.

PUBLISHER/FREE-LANCE COPYWRITER: October 1983 – January 1986
Wrote, designed, produced, published, distributed, promoted, and sold several thousand copies of Only in New Orleans, a collection of cartoons. Created advertising campaigns for free-lance clients.

HEAD COPYWRITER: Peter Mayer Advertising, New Orleans, January 1979 – October 1983
Created multimedia advertising campaigns for Whitney Bank, Greater New Orleans Tourist and Convention Commission, Trappey’s Fine Foods, and other clients.

REPORTER/EDITOR: June 1975 – May 1979
Edited the bilingual regional monthly La Gazette des Acadiens, dedicated to the preservation of Cajun culture. Wrote feature articles and opinion pieces for other publications.

BROADCASTING
Frequent guest host for “Phyllis Schlafly Live,” weekly radio interview program devoted to educational topics, 1998 – 2002.

EDUCATION
B.A. cum laude with honors in English from Tulane University in New Orleans, 1975. Postgraduate work at the University of Southwestern Louisiana (1976) and the University of New Orleans (1979).

PERSONAL
56 years old, excellent health, married with six children. Wife is free-lance graphic artist and full-time homeschooling mother.

References available.

 

Portfolio

 

 

  • Aug 14 / 2012
  • 1
Uncategorized

Happy Birthday to Me!

Turned 56 yesterday. I don’t mind getting old myself, but the kids keep getting older too, and pretty soon Evann and I will be living in this big house all alone. I’m trying to talk her into moving into a cardboard box behind the levee after Crozet & Audrey leave — with a guest box so the kids can come to visit — but she’s resisting. She’s getting old, too, and losing her sense of adventure — which is what attracted her to me in the first place. Or maybe it was her sense of humor. It was some kind of sense, or lack of sense.

  • Apr 04 / 2012
  • 2
Uncategorized

Evann’s Losing It

I’m worried about my wife. I think her eyesight’s failing.

The other day she came home from the grocery store with a bottle of shampoo for people with gray hair. I told her I didn’t think she needed it because her hair’s not all that gray. (Actually, it is pretty gray, but I was trying to be nice. It’s just the way I am.)

You won’t believe her response.

“It’s not for me,” she said. “It’s for you.”

Huh?

Sure, we’ve had an early Spring and I’ve been doing yardwork and getting lots of sun, so my natural blonde highlights are more prominent now than they were a couple of months ago. Still, there’s a world of difference between blonde and gray.

I’m thinking maybe she should take back the shampoo and buy a pair of glasses, instead.

  • Jan 19 / 2012
  • 0
Uncategorized

Have Pen, Will Travel

Hire any one of these guys and get the other five for free! But you must act now. Offer good for a limited time only. Email frd@politickles.com.

FREE-LANCE WEB EDITOR/WRITER: July 2008 – PRESENT
Currently managing content on multiple websites for diverse array of clients and ghostwriting op-eds for national trade organizations.

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR: National Office, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Maryland Heights MO, October 2005 – July 2008
Responsible for website and all publications, PR and advertising, annual meeting, and other member services.

FREE-LANCE EDITOR/WRITER: November 2001 – October 2005
Developed commissioned or self-generated projects in journalism, advertising, and publishing, including innovative multimedia civics program for schoolchildren.

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: America’s Future, St. Louis, May 1995 – November 2001
Wrote and produced conservative commentary broadcast daily on 100+ radio stations and published in 500+ newspapers. Edited bimonthly newsletter. Promoted and publicized America’s Future. Networked with other policy groups. Redesigned newsletter, launched first website, and introduced electronic delivery of commentaries.

HEAD COPYWRITER: Berger & Reed Advertising, New Orleans, January 1991 – May 1995
Created multimedia advertising campaigns for Cox Cable, Baumer Foods, Louisiana Gas Service Company, et al.

EDITOR: The New American, Appleton WI, Jan. 1986 – Jan. 1991
Improved look and content of this biweekly conservative news magazine and personally devised and implemented austerity campaign to reduce annual production costs by $250,000. Assigned articles, edited manuscripts, oversaw production, and devised advertising and promotions.

PUBLISHER/FREE-LANCE COPYWRITER: October 1983 – January 1986
Wrote, designed, produced, published, distributed, promoted, and sold several thousand copies of Only in New Orleans, a collection of cartoons. Created advertising campaigns for free-lance clients.

HEAD COPYWRITER: Peter Mayer Advertising, New Orleans, January 1979 – October 1983
Created multimedia advertising campaigns for Whitney Bank, Greater New Orleans Tourist and Convention Commission, Trappey’s Fine Foods, and other clients.

REPORTER/EDITOR: June 1975 – May 1979
Edited the bilingual regional monthly La Gazette des Acadiens, dedicated to the preservation of Cajun culture. Wrote feature articles and opinion pieces for other publications.

BROADCASTING
Frequent guest host for “Phyllis Schlafly Live,” weekly radio interview program devoted to educational topics, 1998 – 2002.

EDUCATION
B.A. cum laude with honors in English from Tulane University in New Orleans, 1975. Postgraduate work at the University of Southwestern Louisiana (1976) and the University of New Orleans (1979).

PERSONAL
55 years old, excellent health, married with six children. Wife is free-lance graphic artist and full-time homeschooling mother.

References available.

  • Nov 04 / 2011
  • 2
Uncategorized

My Grandfather’s Tuxedo

For years, my grandfather's beautiful, midnight blue, double-breasted wool tuxedo was way too big for me, but it didn't really matter because I hardly ever had an occasion to wear a tux. Once every five years, maybe. When I did wear it, I had to take the waist in on the pants an inch or two on either side and pin it so they wouldn't fall off. Then, about ten years ago, I pulled it out for some event or other and it fit perfectly. It had shrunk, apparently. I took it out today to try it on for my daughter's wedding next week and, lo and behold, it's shrunk again. I was shaken, not stirred. Now I have to go out and rent a blasted monkey suit. I'll bet 007's tux doesn't fit him anymore either.

Something Better than a Diet

  • Oct 08 / 2011
  • 0
Uncategorized

What to be for Halloween

3700 Magazine 1Back in the early 80s, I worked with a bunch of crazy, creative people at an advertising agency in New Orleans. So, when I decided to have a costume party for Halloween at my apartment on Magazine Street, it seemed logical to announce a theme and see what they would come up with.

The first year, 1981, the challenge was to come as a character in a personally modified TV show or movie. Mike T. showed up in a Patton-like costume and announced that he was “General Hospital.” Sid B. and his wife came as characters from “The Best Little Whorehouse on the Prairie.” Alan H. and his wife came in blackface and police uniforms as “Chocolate CHiPS” — which wasn’t the sanest idea for the neighborhood I lived in. I dressed in drag as one of “The Dykes of Hazzard.”

In 1982, I had a “come-as-I-am” party and invited everyone to dress as me. (I don’t recommend this for the thin-skinned.) Some of my guests managed to achieve a reasonable verisimilitude, while others seemed to take a malicious delight in gross exaggeration. Stan S. wore an absurdly long miniature rifle as a tie tack (in imitation of the police-style revolver and handcuff tacks I favored at the time). Linda L. came in khakis with an authentic Jesuit High School bookbag. I, of course, had the most authentic costume.

World's Fair posterIn 1983, with the New Orleans World’s Fair on the horizon, I asked everyone to come as a World’s Fair attraction. I can’t remember what anyone else was, but my wife-to-be, who was still dating someone else at the time, came as the woman featured on the official World’s Fair Poster, with a working fountain cascading from the top of her head, in accord with the “Waters of the World” theme. I was a video machine in an East European arcade: “Warsaw Pactman.”

 

Pages:123
%d bloggers like this: