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  • Dec 12 / 2008
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City That Care Forgot

Everyone in New Orleans still has a Katrina story, and, like the old sailor in Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” everyone is still eager to tell it. — Wes Pruden, Washington Times

Wes Pruden is the last of the great American newspaper editors, and his comments on New Orleans, which he knows well, always hit the mark. As a kid, I often wondered why our most successful native sons all seemed to be emigres, Louis Armstrong being the prime example. But each time I moved away — to Lafayette, just 150 miles to the west, in 1976, to Boston in 1986, and to St. Louis in 1995 — my fortunes improved immediately. New Orleans certainly shaped my character and personality in my youth, but it also seemed to stifle me as I got older. When I last moved back in 1991, I knew immediately that I had made a mistake and couldn’t wait to move away again. Something is desperately wrong there, and whatever it is is not likely to change.

  • Dec 10 / 2008
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Global Warming Hoax Implodes

The UN global warming conference currently underway in Poland is about to face a serious challenge from over 650 dissenting scientists from around the globe who are criticizing the climate claims made by the UN IPCC and former Vice President Al Gore. — Mark Morano, Inhofe EPW Press Blog

You wouldn’t believe all the nasty email I’ve gotten on this subject over the years, in response to articles and limericks I’ve written expressing skepticism about the danger/existence/manmade nature of global warming — much of it, alas, from propagandized students. Is the hoax finally running its course? Let’s hope so.

  • Dec 10 / 2008
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What’s My Sign?

Solution to the alleged problem of overpopulation.

I’m a Leo and a monkey, but my real sign has nothing to do with the zodiac or the Chinese calendar, and it changes all the time. My sign is made out of metal, is attached to my mailbox, and has magnetic letters on it. I’ve been putting silly, cryptic, and inspirational messages on it for 10 years now. It’s become a local landmark and was even written up in a suburban weekly.

  • Dec 10 / 2008
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Unplanned Parenthood

Evann and I advise married couples not to postpone the pleasures of parenthood. “We can’t afford kids right now, we’re just not ready yet” is a frequently heard refrain. We counsel against such rigid pragmatism. If you wait ’til you’re “ready” to have kids, you may never have any, we warn. We certainly weren’t ready for our first child when Maria was born just two weeks shy of our first wedding anniversary, and we weren’t ready for our son either, when he arrived a year ago last November. We were broke when the stork first came, and we’re broke still. The only difference is, we now have five beautiful children who give meaning to our lives in more ways than we can ever describe. — “Pleasures of Unplanned Parenthood,” F.R. Duplantier

It’s been ten years since I wrote the commentary excerpted above, and the only thing that’s changed is that we now have six beautiful children “who give meaning to our lives in more ways than we can ever describe.” Our advice remains the same: Don’t postpone the pleasures of parenthood. You’ll never be “ready.” Practice unplanned parenthood!

  • Dec 09 / 2008
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Fools (and Opportunists) Rushed In

If there is one phrase to describe the events in the subprime meltdown, it is “collective stupidity.” Looking back on the poor underwriting standards for mortgages, the inflated ratings for loans that were packaged together and the unknowns about the new financial instruments that big institutions eagerly gobbled up, it boggles the mind that so many could have rushed in asking so few questions. — John Berlau in Stocks, Futures & Options Magazine

Good overview of a complex subject, placing the blame on too much government intervention, not too little.

  • Dec 09 / 2008
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Growing Our Own Fuel

If we are going to allow a massive raid on the treasury in the hope of providing a speed-bump on the certain road to reorganization and downsizing of Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler, the very least we can do is get for the country something of lasting value in exchange. Here’s a modest proposal: Set America free from its enslaving addiction to oil. — Frank J. Gaffney Jr, Center for Security Policy

As a native of Louisiana, I have a lifelong appreciation for natural resources and the economic opportunities they generate. The collapse of the domestic oil and gas industry in the 1980s was a blow that my hometown has yet to recover from. I was one of thousands of New Orleanians who evacuated 20 years before Katrina, in search of economic opportunity elsewhere. For several years thereafter, I produced a nationally syndicated newspaper and radio commentary called “Behind The Headlines,” promoting free enterprise and limited government. I know, as well as any layman, that energy independence in America requires full exploitation of our domestic reserves of coal, oil, and gas — along with nuclear power plant construction, development of biofuels, and other reasonable options. The only thing holding us back are bogus environmental threats and the financial interests that fabricate them.

WELL, WELL, WELL
Well, I’m not exactly thrilled
When I get my gas tank filled,
But it makes my blood boil
To know that there’s oil
In reserves of our own to be drilled.
— Your Weekly Politickle, F.R. Duplantier